spacepatches

space age collectables

ESA ATV-3 Automated Transfer Vehicle Official Embroidered Patch

ESA ATV-3 Automated Transfer Vehicle Official Embroidered Patch

Patch measures approx 90mm x 90mm

Official ATV-3 patch now available, ATV-4 could only be released following successful launch of ATV-3, please see next post.

ESA ATV-3 Automated Transfer Vehicle Official Embroidered Patch
ATV-3: Edoardo Amaldi


ESA's ATV3 is steadily coming together in Bremen
 
ATV-3’s cargo carrier
 

3 March 2010
 
The third ATV, to be launched to the ISS in early 2012, is named after famous Italian physicist and spaceflight pioneer Edoardo Amaldi.
 

The Italian space agency, ASI, proposed naming ATV-3 after the Italian physicist Edoardo Amaldi (5 September 1908 – 5 December 1989).

“He started working in nuclear physics with Enrico Fermi, did pioneering work in the field of cosmic rays and in the new field of particle physics, becoming an Italian reference character in nuclear science,” said Enrico Saggese, President of ASI.

“Amaldi was one of the few who in the post-war years prompted action ultimately leading to the founding of ESRO, and later ESA.”
 
 

 

ESA's third ATV vessel is named Edoardo Amaldi
   
Edoardo Amaldi, 1908-1989
 

Father of Italian space research
 
Edoardo Amaldi was a leading figure in Italian science in the 20th century, particularly in fundamental experimental physics.

In Rome, in the 1930s, Amaldi was a member of a group of young Italian scientists: the Via Panisperna boys (‘I ragazzi di Via Panisperna’), who, led by Enrico Fermi, made the famous discovery of slow neutrons, which later made possible the nuclear reactor.

He contributed to nuclear physics in the 1930s and 1940s and to cosmic rays and particle physics afterwards.

At the beginning of the 1950s, Amaldi was one of the founding fathers of the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) and from 1952 to 1954 he was Secretary General of CERN’s provisional organisation.

He then became a pioneer in the experimental search for gravitational waves in the 1970s.

It is largely thanks to his drive that Italian physics emerged from the slump following the Second World War.

Amaldi’s concern for peace, and his strong feeling for the responsible role that the scientific community should play in this respect, was always a natural complement to his unshakable belief in the open nature of science and the need for international cooperation.
 
 

 

ESA's ATV3 is steadily coming together in Bremen
   
ATV-3’s avionics bay being delivered
 

“Italy is a key European country in our participation to the International Space Station partnership. By naming the ATV-3 after Edoardo Amaldi we celebrate a great Italian, but also a committed European who understood the importance of pooling resources and minds together to achieve important results,” said Simonetta Di Pippo, ESA Director for Human Spaceflight.

“We are paying tribute to a visionary mind, to a great scientist but also to an idea of cooperation that is also embodied in the International Space Station partnership.”
 
 

“The ATV is the first recurring production of an exploration spacecraft and places Europe a step closer to our partners. I am glad that Italy is taking so much pride in their participation in the ISS which is a recognition of their human and industrial capabilities.”

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March 25, 2012 Posted by | ESA, Hubble Space Telescope, international space station, Space Patches | , , , | Leave a comment

ISS Expedition 32 Embroiderd Patch

Expedition 32 Embroidered Patch

Expedition 32 begins with the Soyuz TMA-03M undocking in May 2012. Three new crew members will arrive shortly thereafter on Soyuz TMA-05M.

Soyuz TMA-04M
Crew: Joe Acaba, Gennady Padalka, Sergei Revin
Launch: March 2012
Landing: September 2012

Soyuz TMA-05M
Crew: Sunita Williams, Yuri Malenchenko, Akihiko Hoshide
Launch: May 2012
Landing: November 2012 

Sunita Williams and Akihiko Hoshide

Image above: NASA astronaut Sunita Williams, Expedition 32 flight engineer and Expedition 33 commander; and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut Akihiko Hoshide, Expedition 32/33 flight engineer, participate in a food tasting session in the Habitability and Environmental Factors Office at NASA’s Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA

This patch represents the 32nd expedition to the International Space Station (ISS) and the significance of the science being conducted there for current and future generations. The arch shape of the patch symbolizes the “doorway” to future space exploration possibilities. The ISS, an orbiting laboratory above the Earth, provides a unique perspective for Earth observation and monitoring. The flame depicts the pursuit of knowledge and highlights the importance of education as the key to future human space flight. The astronaut symbol circles the Earth, acknowledging the work of all astronauts, past, present, and future. The names of each crew member located on the border of the patch are written to honor the various cultures and languages on the mission. The three flags also depict the home countries of the Expedition 32 crew members and signify the collaborative ISS partnership of 15 countries working as one.

October 15, 2011 Posted by | ESA, ISS, JAXA, NASA, Russian Spaceflight, Space Patches | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

NASA-ESA Hubble Anniversary Patch- 21 Years

Celebrating 21 Years of the NASA-ESA Hubble Space Telescope 

This full colour patch measures approx 10cm x 7.5 cm (4″ x 3″)

A limited edition of only 100 patches – a ‘Spaceboosters’ exclusive.

Mission
 
The Hubble Space Telescope (HST), a collaboration between ESA and NASA, is a 2.4 m-diameter space telescope optimised to observe from the ultraviolet to the infrared. Launched in 1990 and designed to be refurbished in space by astronauts, Hubble is one of the greatest scientific projects of all time. Since launch, it has opened our eyes to the wonders of our ‘planetary’ backyard and beyond. In so many ways, Hubble has revolutionised modern astronomy, not only by being an efficient tool for making new discoveries, but also by changing the way astronomical research is done.

Hubble in free orbit

Spacecraft
 
At the heart of HST is a 2.4 m-diameter primary mirror. This supplies light to a collection of five science instruments that work across the entire optical spectrum: from infrared, through the visible, to ultraviolet light.

It has three cameras, two spectrographs and a set of Fine Guidance Sensors that allow Hubble to accurately point to targets on the sky. HST was placed in a low orbit and was designed to be serviced in space by astronauts on the Space Shuttle, thus allowing instruments to be replaced as technology improved, and observatory subsystems to be repaired and modernised.

Power for the computers and scientific instruments is provided by two solar wings. The solar wings also charge six nickel-hydrogen batteries that power the spacecraft for about 25 minutes per orbit while it flies through Earth’s shadow.

The telescope uses an elaborate system of attitude controls to improve its stability during observations. Reaction wheels manoeuvre the telescope into place, and gyroscopes monitor its position in space. Fine Guidance Sensor units are used to lock onto guide stars to ensure the extremely high pointing accuracy needed to make precise observations.

For more info visit:ESA Hubble
NASA Hubble

September 25, 2011 Posted by | Commemorative Space Patch, ESA, Hubble Space Telescope, NASA, space, Space Patches, spaceflight | , , , , , | Leave a comment

ESA Unveils PromISSe Mission Logo

André makes a PromISSe

 
5 September 2011
All the pieces are coming together for the next long mission by a European astronaut. Now it has a name and logo. ESA today revealed the name of André Kuipers’ mission: PromISSe.
 
ESA called on citizens of its member states last June to propose a name for André’s mission and received more than 200 proposals in just a month. Surprisingly, they also came from Slovenia, Australia, India, Mexico and Argentina.

The judges weighed the eligible entries from a wide range of people, from a 13-year-old Italian to an 82-year-old Dutchman.

The vast majority came from the Netherlands – André’s home country – and the winner is one of those.  

It was not a declared intent to embed the abbreviation of the International Space Station in the logo, but both the design and the chosen name have it.

PromISSe represents ‘Programme for Research in Orbit Maximising the Inspiration from the Space Station for Europe’, explained the winner, Wim Holwerda, a 61-year-old Dutchman.

Wim believes that the name “symbolises the promise space exploration poses to the future of our planet and humankind, as well as the role Europe can play in it.”

Three powerful messages are integrated in PromISSe: the crucial role of scientific research, a greater use of the Space Station and the inspirational value of ESA space programmes. 
 

André aboard ISS in 2006
 
André aboard ISS in 2006

An inspirational mission patch
 
The logo for the mission features the Space Station orbiting Earth, accompanied by three icons and six stars.

The PromISSe name crowns a circular design belted with orange cords, while the International Space Station acronym is highlighted in the same colour to bring out the Dutch participation in the mission.

The core of the logo is a globe free of national borders. A silhouette of the ISS is shown circling Earth, about to fly over Europe.

The icons on the left represent the mission’s three crucial elements: science, technology and education.
 
 
The globe stands for a knowledge-based society focused on our planet. The electronic circuit denotes technology. The conical laboratory flask illustrates scientific research.

The six stars represent the six crewmembers, the six months that André will stay in space and, as the stars are similar to those on the EU flag, the European character.
 

André Kuipers during a training session at the GCTC
 
André Kuipers with Don Pettit and Oleg Kononeko at the GCTC

 
André will work on the Station as a member of Expedition 30. His launch is expected in early December, but the specific date will be selected after the Soyuz launch vehicle is returned to service following the Progress loss in August.

September 5, 2011 Posted by | André Kuipers, ESA, international space station, space, Space Patches, spaceflight | , , , , | Leave a comment

MARS 500 Embroidered Mission Patch

MARS 500 Embroidered Mission Patch Available from the Spaceboosters Online Store

3 June 2011
The six men in the Mars500 facility near Moscow have been in isolation now 365 days. The European crewmembers have been writing in their latest letters home about the highlights, monotonous life, team spirit and determination to go on.
 
“Wow, it’s already been a year,” begins Diego Urbina, one of the two Mars500 crewmembers from ESA, in his latest diary entry.

“One way to visualise it is if you think of what you were doing exactly one year ago, and then picture yourself living in a windowless metal box from then!”

The crew have not actually gone anywhere in those 12 months, but in theory they have been to Mars and are now on the way back.  
 

Preparing an EEG recording
   

The crew of six – three Russians, two Europeans and one Chinese – walked from the flashlights of a hectic press conference into their isolation modules on 3 June 2010 and began their virtual mission towards the Red Planet.

The facility faithfully mimics every aspect of an interplanetary flight, as far as it is possible without really flying into space. Their ‘craft’ is composed of four sealed interconnected cylinders with a total volume of 550 cubic metres. They have their own private cabins and they live and work very much like the astronauts on the Space Station.

“The dark side of this routine is that every day for the past year we woke up at the same time to do the same medical controls with the same devices: no weekend or holiday breaks for a year!” writes Romain Charles, another ESA crewmember, in his diary.
 
 

Mars500 EVA training
   

To Mars and back
 
After the first exciting months, life settled into a routine and the crew waited for Mars arrival at the end of January.

They ‘docked’ with a ‘lander’ (in reality, another module connected to their main habitation modules) that had been waiting with supplies in orbit around Mars.

After unloading the cargo, Diego settled into the lander with Wang Yue and Alexandr Smoleevskiy, and ‘landed’ on Mars.

They completed three sorties in Orlan spacesuits into a big hall that was built to look like the martian surface.

During these marswalks they collected samples, set up experiments and drove a rover, like real marsonauts will do one day.

After conquering the Red Planet, the trio ‘flew ‘back to the interplanetary ship, and the crew was reunited to begin their long trip back home on 2 March.

They will ‘arrive’ on 5 November, when the hatch of the isolation facility is opened. The mission will still go on some weeks after that with medical checks and debriefings.
 
 

   

Good spirit
 
The biggest problem of future exploration flights is not necessarily the technology, but the humans and interactions between the crewmembers. This is the main focus of the Mars500 experiment.

“Our crew has been keeping up the dozens of experiments we have to do constantly, no matter the good times or the hard times, producing data of quality that helps some of Europe’s best scientists to evaluate what the space travelers of the future will go through,” writes Diego.

“We still have 5 months ahead of us a lot of opportunities to make this trip to Mars even more special,” adds Romain.

“We have a great crew and although our backgrounds are significantly different, we never had any conflicts between us. That’s why I’m full of optimism for our last days in the Mars500 modules. We’ll see you on the 5th of November when we’ll land on Earth after our 520 day’s journey to the Red Planet, not before!”

Read the newest diaries from Mars500: Romain’s last letter is here and Diego’s letter is here.

Watch also ESA TV’s video about Mars500: ‘One year inside’.

July 17, 2011 Posted by | Space Patches | , , , , | Leave a comment