spacepatches

space age collectables

ESA National Flags Patch

ESA European Space Agency National Flags Patch

The patch in full colour embroidery features the 18 National flags of the all of the ESA members that were current at the time. Since January 2011 they have been joined by Romania and an extra flag inserted. The patch measures appromiately 130mm x 80mm. 

What is ESA?

The European Space Agency (ESA) is Europe’s gateway to space. Its mission is to shape the development of Europe’s space capability and ensure that investment in space continues to deliver benefits to the citizens of Europe and the world.
 
ESA is an international organisation with 18 Member States. By coordinating the financial and intellectual resources of its members, it can undertake programmes and activities far beyond the scope of any single European country.

What does ESA do?

ESA’s job is to draw up the European space programme and carry it through. ESA’s programmes are designed to find out more about Earth, its immediate space environment, our Solar System and the Universe, as well as to develop satellite-based technologies and services, and to promote European industries. ESA also works closely with space organisations outside Europe.

Who belongs to ESA?

Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. Canada takes part in some projects under a Cooperation agreement. Romania signed its Accession Agreement with ESA on 20 January 2011 and will soon become the 19th Member State.

Hungary, Poland, Estonia and Slovenia are ‘European Cooperating States’. Other countries have signed cooperation agreements with ESA.  
 

Paris, 14 July 2003
 
Paris, France – MERIS, 14 July 2003

Where is ESA located?

ESA’s headquarters are in Paris which is where policies and programmes are decided. ESA also has sites in a number of European countries, each of which has different responsibilities:

  • EAC, the European Astronauts Centre in Cologne, Germany;
  • ESAC, the European Space Astronomy Centre, in Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid, Spain;
  • ESOC, the European Space Operations Centre in Darmstadt, Germany;
  • ESRIN, the ESA centre for Earth Observation, in Frascati, near Rome, Italy;
  • ESTEC, the European Space Research and Technology Centre, Noordwijk, the Netherlands.

A new ESA centre has opened in the United Kingdom, at Harwell, Oxfordshire. ESA also has liaison offices in Belgium, USA and Russia; a launch base in French Guiana and ground/tracking stations in various parts of the world.
 
 
How many people work for ESA?

There are around 2200 staff working for ESA, from all the Member States and include scientists, engineers, information technology specialists and administrative personnel.

Where do ESA’s funds come from?

ESA’s mandatory activities (space science programmes and the general budget) are funded by a financial contribution from all the Agency’s Member States, calculated in accordance with each country’s gross national product. In addition, ESA conducts a number of optional programmes. Each Member State decides in which optional programme they wish to participate and the amount they wish to contribute.

How big is ESA’s budget?

ESA’s budget for 2012 is €3920 million. ESA operates on the basis of geographical return, i.e. it invests in each Member State, through industrial contracts for space programmes, an amount more or less equivalent to each country’s contribution.

How much does each European spend on ESA?

European per capita investment in space is very little. On average, every citizen of an ESA Member State pays, in taxes for expenditure on space, about the same as the price of a cinema ticket (in USA, investment in civilian space activities is almost four times as much).

How does ESA operate?

The Council is ESA’s governing body and provides the basic policy guidelines within which ESA develops the European space programme. Each Member State is represented on the Council and has one vote, regardless of its size or financial contribution.

ESA is headed by a Director General who is elected by the Council every four years. Each individual research sector has its own Directorate and reports directly to the Director General. The present Director General of ESA is Jean-Jacques Dordain.

ESA Nations Flag Patch

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January 20, 2012 Posted by | ESA, space, Space Patches | , , , , , | 5 Comments

Space Station Expedition 3 Insignia

The Expedition Three crew members–astronaut Frank L. Culbertson, Jr., commander, and cosmonauts Vladimir N. Dezhurov and Mikhail Tyurin, flight engineers–had the following to say about the insignia for their scheduled mission aboard the International Space Station (ISS): “The book of space history turns from the chapter written onboard the Russian Mir Station and the U.S. Space Shuttle to the next new chapter, one that will be written on the blank pages of the future by space explorers working for the benefit of the entire world. The space walker signifies the human element of this endeavor. The star representing the members of the third expedition, and the entire multi-national Space Station building team, streaks into the dawning era of cooperative space exploration, represented by the image of the International Space Station as it nears completion.”

Expedition 3 Mission Patch Available from the Spaceboosters Online Store

January 1, 2012 Posted by | international space station, NASA, Russian Spaceflight, space, Space Patches, spaceflight | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

International Space Station Expedition 2

The International Space Station Expedition Two patch depicts the Space Station as it appears during the time the second crew will be on board. The Station flying over the Earth represents the overall reason for having a space station: to benefit the world through scientific research and international cooperation in space. The number 2 is for the second expedition and is enclosed in the Cyrillic MKS and Latin ISS which are the respective Russian and English abbreviations for the International Space Station. The United States and Russian flags show the nationalities of the crew indicating the joint nature of the program. When asked about the stars in the background, a crew spokesman said they “…represent the thousands of space workers throughout the ISS partnership who have contributed to the successful construction of our International Space Station.”

Expedition 2 Embroidered Patch

January 1, 2012 Posted by | international space station, NASA, Russian Spaceflight, space, Space Patches, spaceflight | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Space Station Expeditions – Expedition 1

The first International Space Station crew patch is a simplified graphic of the station complex when fully completed. The station is seen with solar arrays turned forward. The last names of the Expedition One crew, Soyuz pilot Yuri Gidzenko, flight engineer Sergei Krikalev, and expedition commander William (Bill) Shepherd, appear under the station symbol.

January 1, 2012 Posted by | international space station, NASA, Russian Spaceflight, Space Patches, spaceflight | , , , , , | Leave a comment

ISS Expedition 34 Embroidered Patch Design

The crew members of the Expedition 34 mission put together the following description of their patch: “The outer border of the Expedition 34 patch takes the mold line of a crew transfer or generic resupply vehicle which will form our bridge to the orbiting outpost throughout the second half of its operational lifetime. Inscribed inside in gold is a craft symbolizing future extra-terrestrial landers that will someday open other celestial destinations to human exploration. Our Sun, which enables the miracle of the only known life in our universe, radiates above the rich and colorful orb of Earth. Its 15 rays represent the countries of the International Space Station (ISS) Partnership whose foresight and sacrifice have enabled the first small steps into our universe. The ISS in flight represents the dedication, ingenuity, and cooperation amongst the thousands and thousands of workers around the globe who have successfully designed and built a wonder of our modern world. The distant stars, like those visible in our night sky, beckon us to come further into the depths of space. ‘Off the Earth. . . For the Earth’ – Our acknowledgement of the responsibility and commitment to work diligently for all inhabitants of planet Earth.”
 
Expedition 34 begins with the Soyuz TMA-05M undocking in October 2012. Three new crew members will arrive shortly thereafter on Soyuz TMA-07M.Soyuz TMA-06M
Crew: Kevin Ford, Oleg Novitskiy, Evgeny Tarelkin
Launch: October 2012
Landing: March 2013

Soyuz TMA-07M
Crew: Chris Hadfield, Tom Marshburn, Roman Romanenko
Launch: November 2012
Landing: May 2013

 
 

December 31, 2011 Posted by | international space station, NASA, Space Patches | , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Missing ISS Expedition 33 Patch

We have featured all of the most recent ISS Expedition patches with the exception of this new patch for Expedition 33.

 

Expedition 33 begins with the Soyuz TMA-04M undocking in September 2012. Three new crew members will arrive shortly thereafter on Soyuz TMA-06M.

Soyuz TMA-05M
Crew: Sunita Williams, Yuri Malenchenko, Akihiko Hoshide
Launch: May 2012
Landing: November 2012

Soyuz TMA-06M
Crew: Kevin Ford, Oleg Novitskiy and Evgeny Tarelkin
Launch: October 2012
Landing: March 2013

Visit the Spaceboosters Online Store for Space Station Collectables.

November 24, 2011 Posted by | ESA, international space station, ISS, NASA, Russian Spaceflight | , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Embroidered Patch for Expedition 36

Expedition 36 Embroidered Patch


Expedition 36 begins with the undocking of Soyuz TMA-07M in May 2013. Three new crew members will arrive aboard Soyuz TMA-09M, which is scheduled to launch in May 2013.

Soyuz TMA-08M
Crew: Chris Cassidy, Pavel Vinogradov, Alexander Misurkin
Launch: March 2013
Landing: September 2013

Soyuz TMA-09M
Crew: Karen Nyberg, Maxim Suraev. Luca Parmitano
Launch: May 2013
Landing: November 2013

Embroidered ISS Expedition 36 Patch

October 15, 2011 Posted by | ESA, international space station, ISS, JAXA, NASA, Russian Spaceflight, Space Patches | , , , , , | Leave a comment

ISS Expedition 35 Patch

Expedition 35 Embroidered Patch 


Emblazoned with a bold 35 for the 35th expedition to the International Space Station (ISS), this patch portrays a natural moonlit view of the Earth from the ISS at the moment of sunrise, one of the sixteen that occur each day at orbital velocity, with glowing bands of Earth’s atmosphere dispersing the sun’s bright light into primary colors.

The Earth is depicted as it often appears from space, without recognizable coastlines or boundaries – just as the international endeavor of living and working together in space blurs technical and cultural boundaries between nations. The ISS is the unseen central figure of the image, since the view is from a window of the Space Station itself, commemorating full use of the Space Station as a long-duration dwelling from which humans can develop techniques and technologies to further explore.

The crew points out, “The arc of the Earth’s horizon with the sun’s arrows of light imply a bow shooting the imagination to Mars and the cosmos where our species may one day thrive.”

Expedition 35 begins with the Soyuz TMA-06M undocking in March 2013. Three new crew members will arrive shortly thereafter on Soyuz TMA-08M.

Soyuz TMA-07M
Crew: Chris Hadfield, Tom Marshburn, Roman Romanenko
Launch: November 2012
Landing: May 2013

Soyuz TMA-08M
Crew: Chris Cassidy, Pavel Vinogradov, Alexander Misurkin
Launch: March 2013
Landing: September 2013

Embroidered Expedition 35 patch available now from the spaceboosters online store

 

October 15, 2011 Posted by | ESA, international space station, ISS, JAXA, NASA, Russian Spaceflight | , , , , | Leave a comment

ISS Expedition 32 Embroiderd Patch

Expedition 32 Embroidered Patch

Expedition 32 begins with the Soyuz TMA-03M undocking in May 2012. Three new crew members will arrive shortly thereafter on Soyuz TMA-05M.

Soyuz TMA-04M
Crew: Joe Acaba, Gennady Padalka, Sergei Revin
Launch: March 2012
Landing: September 2012

Soyuz TMA-05M
Crew: Sunita Williams, Yuri Malenchenko, Akihiko Hoshide
Launch: May 2012
Landing: November 2012 

Sunita Williams and Akihiko Hoshide

Image above: NASA astronaut Sunita Williams, Expedition 32 flight engineer and Expedition 33 commander; and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut Akihiko Hoshide, Expedition 32/33 flight engineer, participate in a food tasting session in the Habitability and Environmental Factors Office at NASA’s Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA

This patch represents the 32nd expedition to the International Space Station (ISS) and the significance of the science being conducted there for current and future generations. The arch shape of the patch symbolizes the “doorway” to future space exploration possibilities. The ISS, an orbiting laboratory above the Earth, provides a unique perspective for Earth observation and monitoring. The flame depicts the pursuit of knowledge and highlights the importance of education as the key to future human space flight. The astronaut symbol circles the Earth, acknowledging the work of all astronauts, past, present, and future. The names of each crew member located on the border of the patch are written to honor the various cultures and languages on the mission. The three flags also depict the home countries of the Expedition 32 crew members and signify the collaborative ISS partnership of 15 countries working as one.

October 15, 2011 Posted by | ESA, ISS, JAXA, NASA, Russian Spaceflight, Space Patches | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

ISS Expedition 31 Patch

Available now the International Space Station Expedition 31 Embroidered Patch through the Spaceboosters Online Store

Unusual design/shape for a mission patch, NASA description:

Thin crescents along the horizons of the Earth and Moon depict International Space Station (ISS) Expedition 31.

The shape of the patch represents a view of our galaxy. The black background symbolizes the research into dark matter, one of the scientific objectives of Expedition 31.
At the heart of the patch are the Earth, Moon, Mars, and asteroids, the focus of current and future exploration.
The ISS is shown in an orbit around the Earth, with a collection of stars for the Expedition 30 and 31 crews. The small stars symbolize the visiting vehicles that will dock with the complex during this expedition.
 
Expedition 31 begins with the Soyuz TMA-22 undocking. Three new crew members will arrive shortly thereafter on Soyuz TMA-04M.Soyuz TMA-03M
Crew: Oleg Kononenko, Andre Kuipers, Don Pettit
Launch target: Dec. 26, 2011
Docking: Dec. 28, 2011
Landing: TBD

Soyuz TMA-04M
Crew: Joe Acaba, Gennady Padalka, Konstantin Valkov
Launch: March 2012
Landing: September 2012

 

October 15, 2011 Posted by | ESA, international space station, NASA | , , , , , | Leave a comment