spacepatches

space age collectables

Shenzhou 9 Embroidered Mission Patch

Highly detailed, rich colours embroidered mission patch for Shenzhou 9. A must for any discerning collector.

shenzhou 9 full colour embroidered mission patch

October 29, 2012 Posted by | China in Space, Commemorative Space Patch, space, Space Patches | , | Leave a comment

NASA Commercial Crew Pin (CCP)

NASA Commercial Crew Pin

Not a space patch but a very nice space pin.

NASA Commercial Crew Pin

The CCP logo is derived from the NASA flight crew symbol as the foundation for the Program. The red/white/blue swoosh illustrates an American led capability. The star depicts a future vehicle emerging from the overlapping double C’s representing the Commercial Crew Program.

The back of the pin is embossed NASA CCP

The U.S. Government, through the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), is investing in the development of a U.S. commercial crew space transportation capability with the goal of achieving safe, reliable, and cost effective access to and return from low-Earth orbit (LEO) and the International Space Station (ISS). The objective is to foster the development of a certified end-to-end Crew Transportation System (CTS) for use in LEO.

Through this development and certification process, NASA will help lay the foundation for future commercial transportation capabilities, upon which the Commercial Partners can market transportation services to the U.S. Government and other customers.  Once a transportation capability is certified for NASA use and services are available, NASA could purchase transportation services to meet its ISS crew rotation and emergency return obligations.

The Commercial Crew Program Office is hosted by Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and is supported by offices at Johnson Space Center (JSC).

Pin available here

 

March 27, 2012 Posted by | NASA, space | , , | Leave a comment

ESA National Flags Patch

ESA European Space Agency National Flags Patch

The patch in full colour embroidery features the 18 National flags of the all of the ESA members that were current at the time. Since January 2011 they have been joined by Romania and an extra flag inserted. The patch measures appromiately 130mm x 80mm. 

What is ESA?

The European Space Agency (ESA) is Europe’s gateway to space. Its mission is to shape the development of Europe’s space capability and ensure that investment in space continues to deliver benefits to the citizens of Europe and the world.
 
ESA is an international organisation with 18 Member States. By coordinating the financial and intellectual resources of its members, it can undertake programmes and activities far beyond the scope of any single European country.

What does ESA do?

ESA’s job is to draw up the European space programme and carry it through. ESA’s programmes are designed to find out more about Earth, its immediate space environment, our Solar System and the Universe, as well as to develop satellite-based technologies and services, and to promote European industries. ESA also works closely with space organisations outside Europe.

Who belongs to ESA?

Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. Canada takes part in some projects under a Cooperation agreement. Romania signed its Accession Agreement with ESA on 20 January 2011 and will soon become the 19th Member State.

Hungary, Poland, Estonia and Slovenia are ‘European Cooperating States’. Other countries have signed cooperation agreements with ESA.  
 

Paris, 14 July 2003
 
Paris, France – MERIS, 14 July 2003

Where is ESA located?

ESA’s headquarters are in Paris which is where policies and programmes are decided. ESA also has sites in a number of European countries, each of which has different responsibilities:

  • EAC, the European Astronauts Centre in Cologne, Germany;
  • ESAC, the European Space Astronomy Centre, in Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid, Spain;
  • ESOC, the European Space Operations Centre in Darmstadt, Germany;
  • ESRIN, the ESA centre for Earth Observation, in Frascati, near Rome, Italy;
  • ESTEC, the European Space Research and Technology Centre, Noordwijk, the Netherlands.

A new ESA centre has opened in the United Kingdom, at Harwell, Oxfordshire. ESA also has liaison offices in Belgium, USA and Russia; a launch base in French Guiana and ground/tracking stations in various parts of the world.
 
 
How many people work for ESA?

There are around 2200 staff working for ESA, from all the Member States and include scientists, engineers, information technology specialists and administrative personnel.

Where do ESA’s funds come from?

ESA’s mandatory activities (space science programmes and the general budget) are funded by a financial contribution from all the Agency’s Member States, calculated in accordance with each country’s gross national product. In addition, ESA conducts a number of optional programmes. Each Member State decides in which optional programme they wish to participate and the amount they wish to contribute.

How big is ESA’s budget?

ESA’s budget for 2012 is €3920 million. ESA operates on the basis of geographical return, i.e. it invests in each Member State, through industrial contracts for space programmes, an amount more or less equivalent to each country’s contribution.

How much does each European spend on ESA?

European per capita investment in space is very little. On average, every citizen of an ESA Member State pays, in taxes for expenditure on space, about the same as the price of a cinema ticket (in USA, investment in civilian space activities is almost four times as much).

How does ESA operate?

The Council is ESA’s governing body and provides the basic policy guidelines within which ESA develops the European space programme. Each Member State is represented on the Council and has one vote, regardless of its size or financial contribution.

ESA is headed by a Director General who is elected by the Council every four years. Each individual research sector has its own Directorate and reports directly to the Director General. The present Director General of ESA is Jean-Jacques Dordain.

ESA Nations Flag Patch

January 20, 2012 Posted by | ESA, space, Space Patches | , , , , , | 5 Comments

Space Station Expedition 3 Insignia

The Expedition Three crew members–astronaut Frank L. Culbertson, Jr., commander, and cosmonauts Vladimir N. Dezhurov and Mikhail Tyurin, flight engineers–had the following to say about the insignia for their scheduled mission aboard the International Space Station (ISS): “The book of space history turns from the chapter written onboard the Russian Mir Station and the U.S. Space Shuttle to the next new chapter, one that will be written on the blank pages of the future by space explorers working for the benefit of the entire world. The space walker signifies the human element of this endeavor. The star representing the members of the third expedition, and the entire multi-national Space Station building team, streaks into the dawning era of cooperative space exploration, represented by the image of the International Space Station as it nears completion.”

Expedition 3 Mission Patch Available from the Spaceboosters Online Store

January 1, 2012 Posted by | international space station, NASA, Russian Spaceflight, space, Space Patches, spaceflight | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

International Space Station Expedition 2

The International Space Station Expedition Two patch depicts the Space Station as it appears during the time the second crew will be on board. The Station flying over the Earth represents the overall reason for having a space station: to benefit the world through scientific research and international cooperation in space. The number 2 is for the second expedition and is enclosed in the Cyrillic MKS and Latin ISS which are the respective Russian and English abbreviations for the International Space Station. The United States and Russian flags show the nationalities of the crew indicating the joint nature of the program. When asked about the stars in the background, a crew spokesman said they “…represent the thousands of space workers throughout the ISS partnership who have contributed to the successful construction of our International Space Station.”

Expedition 2 Embroidered Patch

January 1, 2012 Posted by | international space station, NASA, Russian Spaceflight, space, Space Patches, spaceflight | , , , , , | Leave a comment

NASA-ESA Hubble Anniversary Patch- 21 Years

Celebrating 21 Years of the NASA-ESA Hubble Space Telescope 

This full colour patch measures approx 10cm x 7.5 cm (4″ x 3″)

A limited edition of only 100 patches – a ‘Spaceboosters’ exclusive.

Mission
 
The Hubble Space Telescope (HST), a collaboration between ESA and NASA, is a 2.4 m-diameter space telescope optimised to observe from the ultraviolet to the infrared. Launched in 1990 and designed to be refurbished in space by astronauts, Hubble is one of the greatest scientific projects of all time. Since launch, it has opened our eyes to the wonders of our ‘planetary’ backyard and beyond. In so many ways, Hubble has revolutionised modern astronomy, not only by being an efficient tool for making new discoveries, but also by changing the way astronomical research is done.

Hubble in free orbit

Spacecraft
 
At the heart of HST is a 2.4 m-diameter primary mirror. This supplies light to a collection of five science instruments that work across the entire optical spectrum: from infrared, through the visible, to ultraviolet light.

It has three cameras, two spectrographs and a set of Fine Guidance Sensors that allow Hubble to accurately point to targets on the sky. HST was placed in a low orbit and was designed to be serviced in space by astronauts on the Space Shuttle, thus allowing instruments to be replaced as technology improved, and observatory subsystems to be repaired and modernised.

Power for the computers and scientific instruments is provided by two solar wings. The solar wings also charge six nickel-hydrogen batteries that power the spacecraft for about 25 minutes per orbit while it flies through Earth’s shadow.

The telescope uses an elaborate system of attitude controls to improve its stability during observations. Reaction wheels manoeuvre the telescope into place, and gyroscopes monitor its position in space. Fine Guidance Sensor units are used to lock onto guide stars to ensure the extremely high pointing accuracy needed to make precise observations.

For more info visit:ESA Hubble
NASA Hubble

September 25, 2011 Posted by | Commemorative Space Patch, ESA, Hubble Space Telescope, NASA, space, Space Patches, spaceflight | , , , , , | Leave a comment

NASA Apollo Mission Control Embroidered Patch

Just released by Spaceboosters – NASA Apollo Mission Control Embroidered Patch.

This patch is one of limited edition of only 200 patches. Full colour and fully embroidered – Limited Edition Apollo NASA Space Patch  

Apollo Mission Control PatchWe have also had a small number autographed on the reverse side by NASA Apollo Flight Controller Sy Liebergot - Limited quantity of handsigned patches.NASA Apollo EECOM Sy Liebergot hand signed limited edition embroidered patch

For more information on Sy Liebergot and his book please visit: Sy Lybergot, Apollo Flight Controller and EECOM.

September 12, 2011 Posted by | NASA, space, Space Patches, spaceflight | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

ESA Unveils PromISSe Mission Logo

André makes a PromISSe

 
5 September 2011
All the pieces are coming together for the next long mission by a European astronaut. Now it has a name and logo. ESA today revealed the name of André Kuipers’ mission: PromISSe.
 
ESA called on citizens of its member states last June to propose a name for André’s mission and received more than 200 proposals in just a month. Surprisingly, they also came from Slovenia, Australia, India, Mexico and Argentina.

The judges weighed the eligible entries from a wide range of people, from a 13-year-old Italian to an 82-year-old Dutchman.

The vast majority came from the Netherlands – André’s home country – and the winner is one of those.  

It was not a declared intent to embed the abbreviation of the International Space Station in the logo, but both the design and the chosen name have it.

PromISSe represents ‘Programme for Research in Orbit Maximising the Inspiration from the Space Station for Europe’, explained the winner, Wim Holwerda, a 61-year-old Dutchman.

Wim believes that the name “symbolises the promise space exploration poses to the future of our planet and humankind, as well as the role Europe can play in it.”

Three powerful messages are integrated in PromISSe: the crucial role of scientific research, a greater use of the Space Station and the inspirational value of ESA space programmes. 
 

André aboard ISS in 2006
 
André aboard ISS in 2006

An inspirational mission patch
 
The logo for the mission features the Space Station orbiting Earth, accompanied by three icons and six stars.

The PromISSe name crowns a circular design belted with orange cords, while the International Space Station acronym is highlighted in the same colour to bring out the Dutch participation in the mission.

The core of the logo is a globe free of national borders. A silhouette of the ISS is shown circling Earth, about to fly over Europe.

The icons on the left represent the mission’s three crucial elements: science, technology and education.
 
 
The globe stands for a knowledge-based society focused on our planet. The electronic circuit denotes technology. The conical laboratory flask illustrates scientific research.

The six stars represent the six crewmembers, the six months that André will stay in space and, as the stars are similar to those on the EU flag, the European character.
 

André Kuipers during a training session at the GCTC
 
André Kuipers with Don Pettit and Oleg Kononeko at the GCTC

 
André will work on the Station as a member of Expedition 30. His launch is expected in early December, but the specific date will be selected after the Soyuz launch vehicle is returned to service following the Progress loss in August.

September 5, 2011 Posted by | André Kuipers, ESA, international space station, space, Space Patches, spaceflight | , , , , | Leave a comment