spacepatches

space age collectables

ESA ATV-3 Automated Transfer Vehicle Official Embroidered Patch

ESA ATV-3 Automated Transfer Vehicle Official Embroidered Patch

Patch measures approx 90mm x 90mm

Official ATV-3 patch now available, ATV-4 could only be released following successful launch of ATV-3, please see next post.

ESA ATV-3 Automated Transfer Vehicle Official Embroidered Patch
ATV-3: Edoardo Amaldi


ESA's ATV3 is steadily coming together in Bremen
 
ATV-3’s cargo carrier
 

3 March 2010
 
The third ATV, to be launched to the ISS in early 2012, is named after famous Italian physicist and spaceflight pioneer Edoardo Amaldi.
 

The Italian space agency, ASI, proposed naming ATV-3 after the Italian physicist Edoardo Amaldi (5 September 1908 – 5 December 1989).

“He started working in nuclear physics with Enrico Fermi, did pioneering work in the field of cosmic rays and in the new field of particle physics, becoming an Italian reference character in nuclear science,” said Enrico Saggese, President of ASI.

“Amaldi was one of the few who in the post-war years prompted action ultimately leading to the founding of ESRO, and later ESA.”
 
 

 

ESA's third ATV vessel is named Edoardo Amaldi
   
Edoardo Amaldi, 1908-1989
 

Father of Italian space research
 
Edoardo Amaldi was a leading figure in Italian science in the 20th century, particularly in fundamental experimental physics.

In Rome, in the 1930s, Amaldi was a member of a group of young Italian scientists: the Via Panisperna boys (‘I ragazzi di Via Panisperna’), who, led by Enrico Fermi, made the famous discovery of slow neutrons, which later made possible the nuclear reactor.

He contributed to nuclear physics in the 1930s and 1940s and to cosmic rays and particle physics afterwards.

At the beginning of the 1950s, Amaldi was one of the founding fathers of the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) and from 1952 to 1954 he was Secretary General of CERN’s provisional organisation.

He then became a pioneer in the experimental search for gravitational waves in the 1970s.

It is largely thanks to his drive that Italian physics emerged from the slump following the Second World War.

Amaldi’s concern for peace, and his strong feeling for the responsible role that the scientific community should play in this respect, was always a natural complement to his unshakable belief in the open nature of science and the need for international cooperation.
 
 

 

ESA's ATV3 is steadily coming together in Bremen
   
ATV-3’s avionics bay being delivered
 

“Italy is a key European country in our participation to the International Space Station partnership. By naming the ATV-3 after Edoardo Amaldi we celebrate a great Italian, but also a committed European who understood the importance of pooling resources and minds together to achieve important results,” said Simonetta Di Pippo, ESA Director for Human Spaceflight.

“We are paying tribute to a visionary mind, to a great scientist but also to an idea of cooperation that is also embodied in the International Space Station partnership.”
 
 

“The ATV is the first recurring production of an exploration spacecraft and places Europe a step closer to our partners. I am glad that Italy is taking so much pride in their participation in the ISS which is a recognition of their human and industrial capabilities.”

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March 25, 2012 Posted by | ESA, Hubble Space Telescope, international space station, Space Patches | , , , | Leave a comment

NASA-ESA Hubble Anniversary Patch- 21 Years

Celebrating 21 Years of the NASA-ESA Hubble Space Telescope 

This full colour patch measures approx 10cm x 7.5 cm (4″ x 3″)

A limited edition of only 100 patches – a ‘Spaceboosters’ exclusive.

Mission
 
The Hubble Space Telescope (HST), a collaboration between ESA and NASA, is a 2.4 m-diameter space telescope optimised to observe from the ultraviolet to the infrared. Launched in 1990 and designed to be refurbished in space by astronauts, Hubble is one of the greatest scientific projects of all time. Since launch, it has opened our eyes to the wonders of our ‘planetary’ backyard and beyond. In so many ways, Hubble has revolutionised modern astronomy, not only by being an efficient tool for making new discoveries, but also by changing the way astronomical research is done.

Hubble in free orbit

Spacecraft
 
At the heart of HST is a 2.4 m-diameter primary mirror. This supplies light to a collection of five science instruments that work across the entire optical spectrum: from infrared, through the visible, to ultraviolet light.

It has three cameras, two spectrographs and a set of Fine Guidance Sensors that allow Hubble to accurately point to targets on the sky. HST was placed in a low orbit and was designed to be serviced in space by astronauts on the Space Shuttle, thus allowing instruments to be replaced as technology improved, and observatory subsystems to be repaired and modernised.

Power for the computers and scientific instruments is provided by two solar wings. The solar wings also charge six nickel-hydrogen batteries that power the spacecraft for about 25 minutes per orbit while it flies through Earth’s shadow.

The telescope uses an elaborate system of attitude controls to improve its stability during observations. Reaction wheels manoeuvre the telescope into place, and gyroscopes monitor its position in space. Fine Guidance Sensor units are used to lock onto guide stars to ensure the extremely high pointing accuracy needed to make precise observations.

For more info visit:ESA Hubble
NASA Hubble

September 25, 2011 Posted by | Commemorative Space Patch, ESA, Hubble Space Telescope, NASA, space, Space Patches, spaceflight | , , , , , | Leave a comment