spacepatches

space age collectables

Official André Kuipers ‘Spaceship Earth’ Embroidered Patch

Official André Kuipers 'Spaceship Earth' Embroidered PatchAbout Spaceship Earth

Spaceship Earth
    

During his stay in orbit, André Kuipers will have a unique view of ‘Spaceship Earth’ from his very own spaceship, the International Space Station. From the spectacular vantage point provided by Cupola, the ESA astronaut will have the opportunity to observe both the beauty and fragility of our planet.
 

His observations will support the ESA online lessons designed to help European children strengthen their knowledge in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. These will be part of three themes covering topics such as Life in Space, Biodiversity on Earth and planet Earth’s climate.

As part of Spaceship Earth, André will perform experiments on board which can also be carried out by schools. ESA is providing school kits with replicas of the experiments on board the ISS.  
 

Lessons associated with Spaceschip Earth will be released throughout the PromISSe mission.  
 

Spaceship Earth Theme 1: Life
  

Theme 1: Life

Radiation

Radiation is the term used for all phenomena characterised by the transport of energy, either by waves or sub-atomic particles. This lesson for secondary school students (16-18), explains different types of radiations and how some forms of radiation pose a threat to astronauts.

Balance in Space

Keeping balance on Earth is relatively easy because gravity dictates how the vestibular apparatuses behave in the inner ears. In conditions of microgravity such as on the ISS, astronauts can be very easily disoriented. This lesson for lower secondary school children (12-14) demonstrates how balance can also be affected by visual cues and incorporates a fun practical activity.

Immunology

Understanding how the immune system functions will eventually lead to answers about many diseases including cancers. This lesson, intended for upper secondary school students (14-17), explains the basics of the immune system but also discusses the fact that astronauts in Space, for various reasons, have depressed immune responses. This is particularly important to study if humans are to live in microgravity for extended periods of time
 
 

Life Support Systems

We now have the capability to leave planet Earth. However, if man is to live in space and travel to other planets, we must learn how to survive out there for longer periods of time; we have to recreate in space the vital ingredients for life on Earth.

On the International Space Station many of Earth’s environmental support systems have already been engineered. Examining how some of these key technologies work, allows us to understand the vital ingredients that make Earth such an ideal place to live.

In the DVD ‘Ingredients for Life: On Earth and in Space’, aimed primarily at 16-18 year old students, we explore how ESA is dealing with these scientific and technological challenges, and we answer questions like: Why do we need water and oxygen? How do astronauts get the oxygen they need to survive in space?
 
 

Biodervisity header
 

Theme 2: Biodiversity

Convection

Convection depends on gravity: as liquids and gases heat up they become less dense and lighter. When they cool again, they become denser and fall towards Earth. These processes can be observed in large scale on Earth but also in the small convection loops provided in the ESA EPO kits. Ocean currents and atmospheric movement due to warmth from the Sun determines where life on Earth flourishes and where life struggles. Biodiverse regions on Earth are largely dependent on convection.

Official André Kuipers ‘Spaceship Earth’ Embroidered Patch
 (Dutch Language version)

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July 12, 2012 Posted by | André Kuipers, ESA, international space station, ISS, spaceflight | , | Leave a comment

ESA ATV-4 Automated Transfer Vehicle Official Embroidered Patch

ESA ATV-4 Automated Transfer Vehicle Official Embroidered Patch

Patch measures approx 90mm x 90mm

ATV-4 to carry name Albert Einstein

ATV-4 to carry name Albert Einstein

Official ATV-4 now available, ATV-4 could only be released following the successful launch of ATV-3.

ATV-4 to carry name Albert Einstein

Albert Einstein in 1921
 

 
 

 
With ATV Johannes Kepler in space and ATV Edoardo Amaldi almost built, the next Space Station supply craft coming off the production line has been named after the most famous scientist of all time: Albert Einstein. Launch is expected in early 2013.
 
With relativity and E=mc2, Albert Einstein is a major icon of 20th century science.

His theories have been stringently tested in space and his work is used to guide spacecraft to other planets – and now he will fly into orbit. ESA has decided to name the fourth Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) after Albert Einstein.

 
 

ATV-2 docking on 24 February 2011
   
ATV-2 docking with ISS on 24 February 2011
 

ATVs are an essential contribution by Europe for supplying and maintaining the International Space Station.

The vessels are named after great European scientists and visionaries to highlight Europe’s deep roots in science, technology and culture.

Naming ATV-4 after Albert Einstein, as proposed by the Swiss delegation to ESA, reflects this approach. Einstein’s contributions to humanity and, in particular, science overturned our perception of the Universe.

ATV is also strongly linked to Switzerland: its structure is built by Swiss industry.

 
 

Albert Einstein, 1879 - 1955
   

 

World citizen with roots in Switzerland
 
Albert Einstein was born in 1879 in Ulm, in Germany, but studied and spent his early career in Switzerland.

His job at the patent office in Bern gave him time to develop his revolutionary ideas. His annus mirabilisof 1905 – year of wonder – saw him publish four fundamental scientific papers on the photoelectric effect, Brownian motion, special relativity and the equivalence of matter and energy.

In 1908 he moved to an academic career in Bern and went on to Zurich, Prague, Berlin and, finally, after emigration to the USA before World War II, Princeton University.

He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1921. He died in the USA in 1955 at the age of 76.

 
 
Next two ATVs on production line
 

Pressurised module of the ATV-4
 
Pressurised module for Albert Einstein
 

After launching ATV Johannes Kepler to the Space Station this February, ESA plans to maintain a steady cadence of one vessel per year.

The next, Edoardo Amaldi, is already assembled and is being tested in Bremen, Germany. ATV-3 will be shipped to Europe’s Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana, in August for dispatch to the Station in February 2012.

 
 

Equipped External Bay of the ATV-4
   
Equipped External Bay of the ATV-4
 

The three main parts of ATV-4 are being built. The Integrated Cargo Carrier, designed to carry water, gas, refuelling propellants and dry cargo, is in Turin, Italy, and will be shipped in December to Bremen.

The Equipped Propulsion Bay, housing the engines and propellant tanks, is built in Bremen.

The Equipped Avionics Bay – ATV’s ‘brain’ – will be mated at end of the year with the propulsion section.

The plan is to launch Albert Einstein to the Station at the beginning of 2013.

March 25, 2012 Posted by | ESA, international space station, ISS, Space Patches, Uncategorized | , | Leave a comment

ESA ATV-3 Automated Transfer Vehicle Official Embroidered Patch

ESA ATV-3 Automated Transfer Vehicle Official Embroidered Patch

Patch measures approx 90mm x 90mm

Official ATV-3 patch now available, ATV-4 could only be released following successful launch of ATV-3, please see next post.

ESA ATV-3 Automated Transfer Vehicle Official Embroidered Patch
ATV-3: Edoardo Amaldi


ESA's ATV3 is steadily coming together in Bremen
 
ATV-3’s cargo carrier
 

3 March 2010
 
The third ATV, to be launched to the ISS in early 2012, is named after famous Italian physicist and spaceflight pioneer Edoardo Amaldi.
 

The Italian space agency, ASI, proposed naming ATV-3 after the Italian physicist Edoardo Amaldi (5 September 1908 – 5 December 1989).

“He started working in nuclear physics with Enrico Fermi, did pioneering work in the field of cosmic rays and in the new field of particle physics, becoming an Italian reference character in nuclear science,” said Enrico Saggese, President of ASI.

“Amaldi was one of the few who in the post-war years prompted action ultimately leading to the founding of ESRO, and later ESA.”
 
 

 

ESA's third ATV vessel is named Edoardo Amaldi
   
Edoardo Amaldi, 1908-1989
 

Father of Italian space research
 
Edoardo Amaldi was a leading figure in Italian science in the 20th century, particularly in fundamental experimental physics.

In Rome, in the 1930s, Amaldi was a member of a group of young Italian scientists: the Via Panisperna boys (‘I ragazzi di Via Panisperna’), who, led by Enrico Fermi, made the famous discovery of slow neutrons, which later made possible the nuclear reactor.

He contributed to nuclear physics in the 1930s and 1940s and to cosmic rays and particle physics afterwards.

At the beginning of the 1950s, Amaldi was one of the founding fathers of the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) and from 1952 to 1954 he was Secretary General of CERN’s provisional organisation.

He then became a pioneer in the experimental search for gravitational waves in the 1970s.

It is largely thanks to his drive that Italian physics emerged from the slump following the Second World War.

Amaldi’s concern for peace, and his strong feeling for the responsible role that the scientific community should play in this respect, was always a natural complement to his unshakable belief in the open nature of science and the need for international cooperation.
 
 

 

ESA's ATV3 is steadily coming together in Bremen
   
ATV-3’s avionics bay being delivered
 

“Italy is a key European country in our participation to the International Space Station partnership. By naming the ATV-3 after Edoardo Amaldi we celebrate a great Italian, but also a committed European who understood the importance of pooling resources and minds together to achieve important results,” said Simonetta Di Pippo, ESA Director for Human Spaceflight.

“We are paying tribute to a visionary mind, to a great scientist but also to an idea of cooperation that is also embodied in the International Space Station partnership.”
 
 

“The ATV is the first recurring production of an exploration spacecraft and places Europe a step closer to our partners. I am glad that Italy is taking so much pride in their participation in the ISS which is a recognition of their human and industrial capabilities.”

March 25, 2012 Posted by | ESA, Hubble Space Telescope, international space station, Space Patches | , , , | Leave a comment

ESA National Flags Patch

ESA European Space Agency National Flags Patch

The patch in full colour embroidery features the 18 National flags of the all of the ESA members that were current at the time. Since January 2011 they have been joined by Romania and an extra flag inserted. The patch measures appromiately 130mm x 80mm. 

What is ESA?

The European Space Agency (ESA) is Europe’s gateway to space. Its mission is to shape the development of Europe’s space capability and ensure that investment in space continues to deliver benefits to the citizens of Europe and the world.
 
ESA is an international organisation with 18 Member States. By coordinating the financial and intellectual resources of its members, it can undertake programmes and activities far beyond the scope of any single European country.

What does ESA do?

ESA’s job is to draw up the European space programme and carry it through. ESA’s programmes are designed to find out more about Earth, its immediate space environment, our Solar System and the Universe, as well as to develop satellite-based technologies and services, and to promote European industries. ESA also works closely with space organisations outside Europe.

Who belongs to ESA?

Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. Canada takes part in some projects under a Cooperation agreement. Romania signed its Accession Agreement with ESA on 20 January 2011 and will soon become the 19th Member State.

Hungary, Poland, Estonia and Slovenia are ‘European Cooperating States’. Other countries have signed cooperation agreements with ESA.  
 

Paris, 14 July 2003
 
Paris, France – MERIS, 14 July 2003

Where is ESA located?

ESA’s headquarters are in Paris which is where policies and programmes are decided. ESA also has sites in a number of European countries, each of which has different responsibilities:

  • EAC, the European Astronauts Centre in Cologne, Germany;
  • ESAC, the European Space Astronomy Centre, in Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid, Spain;
  • ESOC, the European Space Operations Centre in Darmstadt, Germany;
  • ESRIN, the ESA centre for Earth Observation, in Frascati, near Rome, Italy;
  • ESTEC, the European Space Research and Technology Centre, Noordwijk, the Netherlands.

A new ESA centre has opened in the United Kingdom, at Harwell, Oxfordshire. ESA also has liaison offices in Belgium, USA and Russia; a launch base in French Guiana and ground/tracking stations in various parts of the world.
 
 
How many people work for ESA?

There are around 2200 staff working for ESA, from all the Member States and include scientists, engineers, information technology specialists and administrative personnel.

Where do ESA’s funds come from?

ESA’s mandatory activities (space science programmes and the general budget) are funded by a financial contribution from all the Agency’s Member States, calculated in accordance with each country’s gross national product. In addition, ESA conducts a number of optional programmes. Each Member State decides in which optional programme they wish to participate and the amount they wish to contribute.

How big is ESA’s budget?

ESA’s budget for 2012 is €3920 million. ESA operates on the basis of geographical return, i.e. it invests in each Member State, through industrial contracts for space programmes, an amount more or less equivalent to each country’s contribution.

How much does each European spend on ESA?

European per capita investment in space is very little. On average, every citizen of an ESA Member State pays, in taxes for expenditure on space, about the same as the price of a cinema ticket (in USA, investment in civilian space activities is almost four times as much).

How does ESA operate?

The Council is ESA’s governing body and provides the basic policy guidelines within which ESA develops the European space programme. Each Member State is represented on the Council and has one vote, regardless of its size or financial contribution.

ESA is headed by a Director General who is elected by the Council every four years. Each individual research sector has its own Directorate and reports directly to the Director General. The present Director General of ESA is Jean-Jacques Dordain.

ESA Nations Flag Patch

January 20, 2012 Posted by | ESA, space, Space Patches | , , , , , | 5 Comments

The Missing ISS Expedition 33 Patch

We have featured all of the most recent ISS Expedition patches with the exception of this new patch for Expedition 33.

 

Expedition 33 begins with the Soyuz TMA-04M undocking in September 2012. Three new crew members will arrive shortly thereafter on Soyuz TMA-06M.

Soyuz TMA-05M
Crew: Sunita Williams, Yuri Malenchenko, Akihiko Hoshide
Launch: May 2012
Landing: November 2012

Soyuz TMA-06M
Crew: Kevin Ford, Oleg Novitskiy and Evgeny Tarelkin
Launch: October 2012
Landing: March 2013

Visit the Spaceboosters Online Store for Space Station Collectables.

November 24, 2011 Posted by | ESA, international space station, ISS, NASA, Russian Spaceflight | , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Embroidered Patch for Expedition 36

Expedition 36 Embroidered Patch


Expedition 36 begins with the undocking of Soyuz TMA-07M in May 2013. Three new crew members will arrive aboard Soyuz TMA-09M, which is scheduled to launch in May 2013.

Soyuz TMA-08M
Crew: Chris Cassidy, Pavel Vinogradov, Alexander Misurkin
Launch: March 2013
Landing: September 2013

Soyuz TMA-09M
Crew: Karen Nyberg, Maxim Suraev. Luca Parmitano
Launch: May 2013
Landing: November 2013

Embroidered ISS Expedition 36 Patch

October 15, 2011 Posted by | ESA, international space station, ISS, JAXA, NASA, Russian Spaceflight, Space Patches | , , , , , | Leave a comment

ISS Expedition 35 Patch

Expedition 35 Embroidered Patch 


Emblazoned with a bold 35 for the 35th expedition to the International Space Station (ISS), this patch portrays a natural moonlit view of the Earth from the ISS at the moment of sunrise, one of the sixteen that occur each day at orbital velocity, with glowing bands of Earth’s atmosphere dispersing the sun’s bright light into primary colors.

The Earth is depicted as it often appears from space, without recognizable coastlines or boundaries – just as the international endeavor of living and working together in space blurs technical and cultural boundaries between nations. The ISS is the unseen central figure of the image, since the view is from a window of the Space Station itself, commemorating full use of the Space Station as a long-duration dwelling from which humans can develop techniques and technologies to further explore.

The crew points out, “The arc of the Earth’s horizon with the sun’s arrows of light imply a bow shooting the imagination to Mars and the cosmos where our species may one day thrive.”

Expedition 35 begins with the Soyuz TMA-06M undocking in March 2013. Three new crew members will arrive shortly thereafter on Soyuz TMA-08M.

Soyuz TMA-07M
Crew: Chris Hadfield, Tom Marshburn, Roman Romanenko
Launch: November 2012
Landing: May 2013

Soyuz TMA-08M
Crew: Chris Cassidy, Pavel Vinogradov, Alexander Misurkin
Launch: March 2013
Landing: September 2013

Embroidered Expedition 35 patch available now from the spaceboosters online store

 

October 15, 2011 Posted by | ESA, international space station, ISS, JAXA, NASA, Russian Spaceflight | , , , , | Leave a comment

ISS Expedition 32 Embroiderd Patch

Expedition 32 Embroidered Patch

Expedition 32 begins with the Soyuz TMA-03M undocking in May 2012. Three new crew members will arrive shortly thereafter on Soyuz TMA-05M.

Soyuz TMA-04M
Crew: Joe Acaba, Gennady Padalka, Sergei Revin
Launch: March 2012
Landing: September 2012

Soyuz TMA-05M
Crew: Sunita Williams, Yuri Malenchenko, Akihiko Hoshide
Launch: May 2012
Landing: November 2012 

Sunita Williams and Akihiko Hoshide

Image above: NASA astronaut Sunita Williams, Expedition 32 flight engineer and Expedition 33 commander; and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut Akihiko Hoshide, Expedition 32/33 flight engineer, participate in a food tasting session in the Habitability and Environmental Factors Office at NASA’s Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA

This patch represents the 32nd expedition to the International Space Station (ISS) and the significance of the science being conducted there for current and future generations. The arch shape of the patch symbolizes the “doorway” to future space exploration possibilities. The ISS, an orbiting laboratory above the Earth, provides a unique perspective for Earth observation and monitoring. The flame depicts the pursuit of knowledge and highlights the importance of education as the key to future human space flight. The astronaut symbol circles the Earth, acknowledging the work of all astronauts, past, present, and future. The names of each crew member located on the border of the patch are written to honor the various cultures and languages on the mission. The three flags also depict the home countries of the Expedition 32 crew members and signify the collaborative ISS partnership of 15 countries working as one.

October 15, 2011 Posted by | ESA, ISS, JAXA, NASA, Russian Spaceflight, Space Patches | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

ISS Expedition 31 Patch

Available now the International Space Station Expedition 31 Embroidered Patch through the Spaceboosters Online Store

Unusual design/shape for a mission patch, NASA description:

Thin crescents along the horizons of the Earth and Moon depict International Space Station (ISS) Expedition 31.

The shape of the patch represents a view of our galaxy. The black background symbolizes the research into dark matter, one of the scientific objectives of Expedition 31.
At the heart of the patch are the Earth, Moon, Mars, and asteroids, the focus of current and future exploration.
The ISS is shown in an orbit around the Earth, with a collection of stars for the Expedition 30 and 31 crews. The small stars symbolize the visiting vehicles that will dock with the complex during this expedition.
 
Expedition 31 begins with the Soyuz TMA-22 undocking. Three new crew members will arrive shortly thereafter on Soyuz TMA-04M.Soyuz TMA-03M
Crew: Oleg Kononenko, Andre Kuipers, Don Pettit
Launch target: Dec. 26, 2011
Docking: Dec. 28, 2011
Landing: TBD

Soyuz TMA-04M
Crew: Joe Acaba, Gennady Padalka, Konstantin Valkov
Launch: March 2012
Landing: September 2012

 

October 15, 2011 Posted by | ESA, international space station, NASA | , , , , , | Leave a comment

NASA-ESA Hubble Anniversary Patch- 21 Years

Celebrating 21 Years of the NASA-ESA Hubble Space Telescope 

This full colour patch measures approx 10cm x 7.5 cm (4″ x 3″)

A limited edition of only 100 patches – a ‘Spaceboosters’ exclusive.

Mission
 
The Hubble Space Telescope (HST), a collaboration between ESA and NASA, is a 2.4 m-diameter space telescope optimised to observe from the ultraviolet to the infrared. Launched in 1990 and designed to be refurbished in space by astronauts, Hubble is one of the greatest scientific projects of all time. Since launch, it has opened our eyes to the wonders of our ‘planetary’ backyard and beyond. In so many ways, Hubble has revolutionised modern astronomy, not only by being an efficient tool for making new discoveries, but also by changing the way astronomical research is done.

Hubble in free orbit

Spacecraft
 
At the heart of HST is a 2.4 m-diameter primary mirror. This supplies light to a collection of five science instruments that work across the entire optical spectrum: from infrared, through the visible, to ultraviolet light.

It has three cameras, two spectrographs and a set of Fine Guidance Sensors that allow Hubble to accurately point to targets on the sky. HST was placed in a low orbit and was designed to be serviced in space by astronauts on the Space Shuttle, thus allowing instruments to be replaced as technology improved, and observatory subsystems to be repaired and modernised.

Power for the computers and scientific instruments is provided by two solar wings. The solar wings also charge six nickel-hydrogen batteries that power the spacecraft for about 25 minutes per orbit while it flies through Earth’s shadow.

The telescope uses an elaborate system of attitude controls to improve its stability during observations. Reaction wheels manoeuvre the telescope into place, and gyroscopes monitor its position in space. Fine Guidance Sensor units are used to lock onto guide stars to ensure the extremely high pointing accuracy needed to make precise observations.

For more info visit:ESA Hubble
NASA Hubble

September 25, 2011 Posted by | Commemorative Space Patch, ESA, Hubble Space Telescope, NASA, space, Space Patches, spaceflight | , , , , , | Leave a comment